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African Immigration: Slavery and Beyond


Famous African Immigrants:
Famous African Immigrants:

Sources detailing the history of the forced immigration of Africans during the slave trade are easy to locate...you will find one comprehensive resource below. To complement this period of immigration are sources discussing current trends and experiences of African immigrates to the United States.
  • The Library of Congress has created a site that traces immigration to US and migrations within US of peoples of African descent. Use very small links at bottom of page to navigate forward and backwards through the site. You can also enlarge primary sources throughout site by clicking on them.

  • The New York Times (February 21, 2005) published "More Africans enter US than in days of slavery." This article provides an analysis of changes in the migration patterns of people from Africa and provides insights into the reasons for these new patterns.

  • The Migration Policy Institute's ongoing project Migration Information Source published "African Immigrants in the United States" (July, 2011). This statistics heavy report provides a comprehensive picture of African immigrants c. 2009 and makes comparisons between African immigrants and other immigrant groups.

  • "Culture clash between Africans and African-Americans" was broadcast on National Public Radio (June 28, 2013). This resource provides insights into the differences perceived by Africans and African-Americans towards each other. Click "listen" to hear audio and/or read transcript of this interview.

  • Personal blog posts have a research value: they can provide narrow insights into an issue through the testimonial of an individual. DO NOT GENERALIZE FROM THIS SOURCE. "Fail to distinguish African immigration from slave decent" is a description of the experiences and feelings of a single African immigrant to the United States and her sense of connection with the African-American community.